February 28

Upper Mountain Water Quality Addressed By Squaw Valley

Following the detection in early November of two forms of bacteria, E. coli and coliform, in Squaw Valley’s Upper Mountain drinking water supply, a statement was issued by Squaw Valley addressing the issue following subsequent treatment and reported improvement of the water supply’s condition. The statement was provided on November 30 by Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows Public Relations Director, Liesl Kenney, and contained the following information:

 

A number of water systems throughout Placer County, including Squaw Valley, were adversely affected as a result of a significantly heavy rain event in October. At Squaw Valley, a newly upgraded water system that had been installed last summer was contaminated at the locations of Gold Coast and High Camp. The statement emphasized that no other Squaw Valley water systems were impacted by the storm, and none of the contaminated water was ever available to the public for human consumption.

 

The steps taken by Squaw Valley to address the situation after it was detected were swift and appropriate. Contact was immediately made with Placer County Environmental Health and Squaw Valley Public Service District to inform them of the issue. Recognized experts in water quality were also contacted to discuss the appropriate measures that needed to be taken to remedy the problem. Water use at Gold Coast and High Camp has been suspended while the situation continues to be addressed, and will only resume once water safety experts and public health officials have indicated that it is safe to do so.

 

The statement went on to provide assurance from Squaw Valley that customer safety is their top priority, therefore; all guests at the adversely affected areas will be provided with free bottled drinking water, along with unaltered facility access while work continues to fully resolve the situation. In addition, guests will be notified upon confirmation from water quality experts that the water is completely safe to drink.

 

Squaw Valley concluded by thanking the county and the local public service district for their help in addressing the Upper Mountain water quality issue.

 

 




Posted February 28, 2017 by Shell in category "News